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Canada's First Cond...
 

Canada's First Condominium: Vancouver, Edmonton or ??  

 
(@calgarymark-2)
Trusted Member Paid Members

There's an interesting article in a recent edition of The Tyee: In Search of Canada’s First Condos, and the Woman Who Paved the Way. The article explores where Canada's first condominium was built and registered (Was it Point Grey Road in Vancouver or Brentwood Village in Edmonton?) and talks about the woman developer who set about making the Vancouver project happen.

What do you know about the first condominium development? Could it have happened in (gasp!) Toronto? Can you add to the story?

This topic was modified 5 months ago by CalgaryMark
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Posted : 27/11/2018 11:23 pm
GibsonT liked
(@terry-g)
Trusted Member

I went to High School in Port Moody from 1963-1966 and I believe the Hi-View Estates project was about half way up the road to the escarpment.

Many don't realize how new condominium ownership is to Canada.  BC and Alberta passed the legislation in 1967, if I recall correctly.

While working for CMHC in Victoria in 1969 I first learned of condos.  A lumber company built a townhouse development in Gold River in 1967/68 to support a new login operation.  It was interesting, because the legislation, originally based on that in New South Wales, Australia I believe, defined a condo as having at least one unit above another, e.g. A strata.  So there were 2 units built as an up and down duplex and the rest, about 100, as townhouses.

While I was with CMHC 1969-1980 (in 6 cities in Ontario and BC), we frequently financed condos as a low-cost purchase housing.  The challenge: I don't think they were frequently managed well because the low-income owners did not have the collective skill set.  (and probably the condominium property managers of the time had little also).

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Posted : 30/11/2018 6:39 pm
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